Wikis

From the Hawaiian word for 'quick', Wikis may be summarized as a webpage that any user can update without logging in or needing special server access. If they can browse or surf to the page, then they can update it. The most famous example of a wiki is Wikipedia.org, the online encyclopedia created and updated by users.

Instructional uses for wikis include:

  • group projects
  • group essays
  • individual projects, assembled onto a group webpage
  • role plays
  • simulations, such as a simulated company's website
  • class notes, or summary of the content

Instructors can create a free wiki at multiple sites, but the recommended site is http://www.wikispaces.com. Once registered there, you may 'create a space' by choosing a name, and then let your students know the location of the wiki in the syllabus, or by announcing it in class. If you choose to only let 'members' update the wiki, then you'll have to grant your students membership access, one at a time.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Gina Gresham
College of Education Gina   Gresham I have the honor and privilege to be a mathematics educator. My responsibilities are plentiful as I seek to inspire my students with a desire to learn. I find the establishment of a positive, caring learning environment, one that encourages students to "believe in yourself with dedication and pride" to be priceles...

Ray Sturm
College of Business Administration Ray   Sturm As an educator, I am simultaneously on two joint and inseparable missions. I am on a mission to serve the students by transforming their lives through the imparting of knowledge and the modeling of intellectual curiosity, but I’m also on a mission to serve the community at large by sending them intelligent, ...

Alisha Janowsky
College of Sciences Alisha    Janowsky Students enter my classroom with intuitions about "why people do what they do." No matter the course modality or class enrollment, my goal is to challenge these ideas and get students thinking "like scientists." To that end, I encourage students to share and then reassess their theories in light of course ...