Wikis

From the Hawaiian word for 'quick', Wikis may be summarized as a webpage that any user can update without logging in or needing special server access. If they can browse or surf to the page, then they can update it. The most famous example of a wiki is Wikipedia.org, the online encyclopedia created and updated by users.

Instructional uses for wikis include:

  • group projects
  • group essays
  • individual projects, assembled onto a group webpage
  • role plays
  • simulations, such as a simulated company's website
  • class notes, or summary of the content

Instructors can create a free wiki at multiple sites, but the recommended site is http://www.wikispaces.com. Once registered there, you may 'create a space' by choosing a name, and then let your students know the location of the wiki in the syllabus, or by announcing it in class. If you choose to only let 'members' update the wiki, then you'll have to grant your students membership access, one at a time.

 

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