SoTL

What is the Scholarship of Teaching & Learning (SoTL)?

The Scholarship of Teaching and Learning (SoTL) uses discovery, reflection, and evidence-based methods to research effective teaching and student learning. These findings are peer reviewed and publicly disseminated in an ongoing cycle of systematic inquiry into classroom practices.

Different research methods and arguments can be used to demonstrate student learning, though they vary in the strength of evidence they can provide. Deductive arguments and experimental methods generally provide stronger evidence of learning than inductive arguments and case studies, though combining methods can capitalize on the advantages of each. Any of these can be effective SoTL methods.

The tools and resources in this website are designed to clarify different research methods and provide a spectrum of choices for designing and implementing SoTL projects.

Other SoTL Definitions
See how other institutions define SoTL.

How is SoTL Useful for Me?
Information on how engaging in SoTL research can help with your research, teaching, and career goals.

Kinds of SoTL Projects
An article that categorizes, lists and describes the different kinds of SoTL projects that could be done.

SoTL Topics
A list of topics that SoTL projects could be based on.

Faculty Center SoTL Library
Additional reference materials on SoTL topics including those available at the Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning.

Carnegie SoTL Tutorial
PowerPoint presentation from the Carnegie Foundation and the University of Indiana-Bloomington, covering SoTL descriptions, definitions, parameters, scope, examples, methodologies, and publication ideas.

National Survey of Student Engagement (NSSE)

Files and documents from NSSE focus groups at UCF.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Robert Borgon
College of Medicine Robert    Borgon Teaching is a learning experience, and effectively engaging and transferring knowledge to hundreds of students is a skill that must be developed and improved upon each semester. I believe teaching can be honed through experience, listening to students, learning from colleagues, and developing new ways to connect t...

Matthew Bryan
College of Arts & Humanities Matthew    Bryan Students often tell me--openly, and sometimes proudly--that they hate writing. I like these students a lot. They talk about writing as though it's something they just cannot do, as if writing were a talent like being able to wiggle your ears or lick your elbow. Sometimes they tell quieter, sadder stories, too, sto...

Karen Mottarella
College of Sciences Karen Mottarella Carl Rogers' Humanistic model inspires my teaching philosophy. The university classroom provides the perfect environment for students to develop their potential to grow positively. The university classroom is also a perfect forum to challenge and expand world views and views of "self." The opportunity for student...