Course Preview

The course preview is an optional feature that enables faculty members to provide a tentative syllabus to potential students who are in the process of selecting and registering for classes. Accessing an advanced and abridged copy of the syllabus may help students to select a mix of courses that will enhance their academic success. While an abridged syllabus will obviously not include all course details, it can give potential students information about course structure, learning outcomes, prerequisites, workload, etc., which may help to minimize add/drop activity in the first week of courses and help support effective advising.

The preliminary syllabus can only be seen by current UCF students and is not available via the public search for classes. This information will only be made available to students if faculty choose to opt-in to the feature. To do so, faculty must use the Syllabus tool in the Webcourses@UCF course and choose the “Display Syllabus” option in Faculty Webcourse Manager. Instructions for how to do this can be found on the Online@UCF website.

This feature can be used in all courses, whether they include a significant online component or not. We suggest that faculty members whose courses do include significant online components and who use the previously available Syllabus tool either 1) update the Syllabus tool when the semester starts (which will cause the full version to be available via the myUCF search) or 2) hide the tool and provide a more complete syllabus elsewhere in the Webcourses@UCF course. (Please note that pictures and web links are not supported in the myUCF view of the syllabus.)

Here is a sample abridged syllabus that can be modified to fit any course. The example includes all of the UCF required components for the actual course syllabus as well as information that may help students choose their classes, but individual faculty members may choose to provide significantly more or less information in the preview version.

 

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Kevin Mackie
College of Engineering and Computer Science Kevin Mackie I believe in challenging students with concepts and historical, theoretical, and contemporary problems while sharing my passion for the subject matter. Ensuring students are forced to think for themselves is essential. I accomplish this in my classes through team and individual problem-solving sessions, and compli...

Susan D. Gosnell
College of Health and Public Affairs Susan D. Gosnell Teaching isn’t teaching unless learners are learning!In order for students to learn how to learn and to think deeply and critically, the traditional model of teaching must be readdressed. Students cannot learn these skills by sitting passively, listening to a lecture and then attempting to regurgitate the ...

Claudia Schippert
College of Arts and Humanities Claudia  Schippert At the center of my teaching philosophy is my commitment to challenge students to examine “common sense” knowledge and to think creatively from different perspectives in order to grapple with complex negotiations of religious, political, and cultural identities in different times and places. I ask ...