Course Preview

The course preview is an optional feature that enables faculty members to provide a tentative syllabus to potential students who are in the process of selecting and registering for classes. Accessing an advanced and abridged copy of the syllabus may help students to select a mix of courses that will enhance their academic success. While an abridged syllabus will obviously not include all course details, it can give potential students information about course structure, learning outcomes, prerequisites, workload, etc., which may help to minimize add/drop activity in the first week of courses and help support effective advising.

The preliminary syllabus can only be seen by current UCF students and is not available via the public search for classes. This information will only be made available to students if faculty choose to opt-in to the feature. To do so, faculty must use the Syllabus tool in the Webcourses@UCF course and choose the “Display Syllabus” option in Faculty Webcourse Manager. Instructions for how to do this can be found on the Online@UCF website.

This feature can be used in all courses, whether they include a significant online component or not. We suggest that faculty members whose courses do include significant online components and who use the previously available Syllabus tool either 1) update the Syllabus tool when the semester starts (which will cause the full version to be available via the myUCF search) or 2) hide the tool and provide a more complete syllabus elsewhere in the Webcourses@UCF course. (Please note that pictures and web links are not supported in the myUCF view of the syllabus.)

Here is a sample abridged syllabus that can be modified to fit any course. The example includes all of the UCF required components for the actual course syllabus as well as information that may help students choose their classes, but individual faculty members may choose to provide significantly more or less information in the preview version.

 

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Sandra Wheeler
College of Sciences Sandra Wheeler As an anthropologist and educator, I engage students in the exploration of human difference and understand it as a strength rather than weakness. In the current political climate where human difference is commonly feared and vilified, we need students to think anthropologically and appreciate the complex and diver...

Lindsay Neuberger
College of Sciences Lindsay   Neuberger As an instructor I use four specific pedagogical techniques to encourage an engaged environment: 1) remain organized, 2) develop examples connecting course content to salient student situations, 3) align course concepts with employment opportunities, and 4) be available to students. Organization may seem like ...

Cynthia Gundy
College of Business Administration Cynthia  Gundy A college education is about preparing students for the rest of their professional lives. Indeed students must be taught the discipline's jargon, its decision making tools and how best to apply them as well as the underlying foundation on which those theories are based. But so many other critical lessons are k...