Widespread Absences Lesson Plan

Strategies you can use for your classes when large numbers of students are likely
to be absent or even when they are not.

  • Give more and smaller quizzes: missing a quiz does not impact as much content. Make-ups are quicker. Also gives students feedback more often. 
  • Drop the lowest test/assignment grade(s). (See our tutorial on advanced gradebook functions in Excel) .
  • Offer "amnesty" quizzes, tests, or papers later in the semester as replacements for any missed assessments earlier.
  • Record your regular lectures as podcasts and put on your course Web site or the Knight’s E-Mail’s OneDrive.
  • Record alternative lectures "after-the-fact" as podcasts.
  • Optional make-up exams:  Students can request a make-up instead of dropping the lowest grade (must schedule within 24 hours of exam and take it before next class meeting).
  • Provide online testing rather than face to face testing.
  • Be flexible with deadlines:  Each student gets one or more Free Late Assignment passes.
  • Provide lecture notes online via Webcourses, Knight's Email OneDrive, or other external Web site such as a wiki.
  • Use multiple versions of tests with equivalent but different questions.  You could use Question Sets in Webcourses or test banks that come with many textbooks for this.
  • Create online resources (readings, modules, activities) through a Web page or within Webcourses
  • Faculty teaching the same course or in the same department could serve as substitutes for each other in case they become ill.
  • Encourage students to notify faculty if they are ill rather than just not showing up in class.
  • Visit the Faculty Center or email fctl@ucf.edu for more ideas.

Faculty are encouraged to add their suggestions to this list. Do so by emailing fctl@ucf.edu

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Ann Marie Whyte
College of Business Administration Ann Marie     Whyte My role as educator is an important component of my contributions to the University of Central Florida. Consistent with my goal of becoming a more effective educator, my teaching style has evolved considerably over the years. I recognize that students learn in a variety of ways and seek to create a rich environmen...

Melody Bowdon
College of Arts and Humanities Melody     Bowdon I have taught undergraduate writing classes for over fifteen years, and the most gratifying aspect of my experience has always been seeing students make ethical use of concepts and techniques learned from my classes in their lives as professionals and citizens. For me, teaching writing is teaching thinking, and th...

Tison Pugh
College of Arts and Sciences Tison   Pugh The one common feature of all medieval literature, despite differences in authors, cultures, and genres, is that it is very, very old. When beginning my courses, I often face resistant students who have predetermined that, because of its age, the literature under examination is useless, if not altogether d...