Classroom response systems (CRS) are communication technologies that can enhance student engagement and learning in large classes and facilitate classroom management tasks. They are also known as "classroom communication systems," "classroom performance systems," "student response systems," "personal response systems," "audience response systems," or "clickers."

Some clickers are purchased as a physical device and some are purchased as an application for a mobile device. Applications on mobile devices are often referred to as Bring Your Own Device (BYOD) technologies. Some clicker companies offer integrated solutions that work with physical clickers and BYOD.

There are multiple considerations for clicker adoption at UCF. If you would like to implement clickers into one or more of your courses, please consider the following:

1. Choose a product

UCF faculty members are free to use any clicker system they choose and the Faculty Center does not endorse any third-party vendors. In order to facilitate the process, we do work with several companies that have a presence on campus. These products have been vetted to ensure they meet all of UCF’s standards for educational technologies. While you are welcome to use another company, you would need to have the company vetted for UCF standards, indicated in the following steps.

Four vendors are currently vetted to meet UCF standards: i>clicker, Learning Catalytics, Top Hat, and TurningTechnologies. If you decide to adopt one of these four technologies, you may skip many of the steps below (as indicated). For more information contact the Faculty Center or individual vendors.

Product Name Physical Clicker BYOD
Learning Catalytics  
Top Hat  

If you would like to test any of the products above in a classroom setting, you can reserve the Faculty Center’s classroom (Classroom Building 1, Room 205) and use the Faculty Center’s free accounts. The room has a computer console with instructor accounts, a projector, 30 iPads with student accounts, and physical clicker sets. To book CB1-205, email Amber Mullens with your preferred date and time; copy Anna Turner with any demonstration or technology requests.

2. Adopt clickers through the UCF Bookstore

To comply with the Textbook Affordability Act, the UCF Bookstore needs your order for any instructional materials 45 days in advance of the start of the semester. Under this act, clickers are considered an “instructional material” and, therefore, are held to the same requirements as textbooks.

Virtual clickers run on student devices. Students may purchase an access code from the UCF Bookstore to pay for the software. Students who are on financial aid must purchase access codes from the UCF Bookstore to avoid any out-of-pocket expenses, so it is important that these adoptions be reported and marked as “required materials.”

To report your adoptions to the bookstore, you can either:

  1. Use Faculty Enlight: Choose “Add non-text materials” and enter an item description.


  1. Email your adoption choices to

3. Enable gradebook integration for Webcourses

Many clickers have the ability to integrate with Webcourses, including the four technologies listed above.  This means that grades can automatically be transferred from the clicker system to the Webcourses gradebook from within the Webcourses platform. Integration can be enabled for individual courses or instructors, select departments, or entire colleges.

To enable clicker integration into your courses, email with the following information: 1) name of the course(s), including section number (Ex: UCF 1500-0001); and 2) the name of the clicker system (i>clicker, Learning Catalytics, Top Hat, TurningPoint). 

4. Update your syllabus

If clickers are going to be a required material for your class (which is recommended), they must be listed in your syllabus as such. You may want to also consider adding clicker-related policies to your syllabus regarding: bringing devices to class, forgotten devices, and malfunctioning technology.

5. Maintain data security standards

Since many of the newer classroom response systems, especially BYOD systems, transmit protected student data, the systems must meet UCF data security standards. The aforementioned products have already been vetted for UCF’s data security standards through the Information Security Office. If you would like to use a different product, you would need to initiate the process by which companies are vetted for data security. Both you and the company would jointly submit the third-party data security assurance questionnaire to the Information Security Office.

Once the company has been vetted for data security, make sure to handle student data appropriately.

6. Consider accessibility needs

These products are undergoing testing for ADA compliance by UCF’s Student Accessibility Services. If you receive a letter from Student Accessibility Services about a student that needs accommodations and are unsure what clicker accommodations need to be made, contact SAS.


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