Technology

This section presents a collection of local and Internet resources focused on using technology to assist faculty in managing many teaching and learning processes, from course planning to assessment grading and all points in between. Several of the tools described here are specific to UCF.

New instructors may wish to take particular note of how to download the class roster and print photos of your students, as well as the digital control panel in the classrooms and our grade posting system, myUCF Grades.

University faculty and staff are expected to adhere to information security guidelines regarding the handling and security of sensitive information. UCF Computer Services & Telecommunications offers a brochure on this information: Click here

For all of these tools, additional help is available via a phone call (407-823-3544) or a trip to the Faculty Center (CB1-207).

Technology Pages

 

Educational Technology Pages

 

External Links

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Stephanie Vie
College of Arts & Humanities Stephanie  Vie No matter the class I teach, rhetoric serves as our foundation. Rhetorical literacy - which I define as an individual's ability to critically analyze a communication situation and best select from the available communicative strategies - is my pedagogical touchstone. To focus on rhetorical literacy, I ask students...

Bruce Wilson
College of Arts and Sciences Bruce  Wilson My role as a teacher is to provide students with excellent training in Political Science and to equip them with the necessary skills to succeed in their careers and to become lifelong learners. I emphasize critical thinking and writing skills and expose students to an increasingly diverse and global political wor...

Matthew Bryan
College of Arts & Humanities Matthew    Bryan Students often tell me--openly, and sometimes proudly--that they hate writing. I like these students a lot. They talk about writing as though it's something they just cannot do, as if writing were a talent like being able to wiggle your ears or lick your elbow. Sometimes they tell quieter, sadder stories, too, sto...