Course Preview

The course preview is an optional feature that enables faculty members to provide a tentative syllabus to potential students who are in the process of selecting and registering for classes. Accessing an advanced and abridged copy of the syllabus may help students to select a mix of courses that will enhance their academic success. While an abridged syllabus will obviously not include all course details, it can give potential students information about course structure, learning outcomes, prerequisites, workload, etc., which may help to minimize add/drop activity in the first week of courses and help support effective advising.

The preliminary syllabus can only be seen by current UCF students and is not available via the public search for classes. This information will only be made available to students if faculty choose to opt-in to the feature. To do so, faculty must use the Syllabus tool in the Webcourses@UCF course and choose the “Display Syllabus” option in Faculty Webcourse Manager. Instructions for how to do this can be found on the Online@UCF website.

This feature can be used in all courses, whether they include a significant online component or not. We suggest that faculty members whose courses do include significant online components and who use the previously available Syllabus tool either 1) update the Syllabus tool when the semester starts (which will cause the full version to be available via the myUCF search) or 2) hide the tool and provide a more complete syllabus elsewhere in the Webcourses@UCF course. (Please note that pictures and web links are not supported in the myUCF view of the syllabus.)

Here is a sample abridged syllabus that can be modified to fit any course. The example includes all of the UCF required components for the actual course syllabus as well as information that may help students choose their classes, but individual faculty members may choose to provide significantly more or less information in the preview version.

 

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Scott Bukstein
College of Business Administration Scott  Bukstein My teaching philosophy is centered on challenging undergraduate students intellectually to enable students to develop personally, academically, and professionally. I fully understand that there is a difference between an instructor lecturing and students learning. I view each class period as an interactive bus...

Dennis Filler
College of Engineering & Computer Science Dennis Filler Since the Industrial Revolution U.S. universities have been producing assembly-line engineers, technically astute but weak in management skills. Traditionally, engineers have not been good managers and business owners. Then, in the late 1970s, academic decision makers decided that engineering schools should progre...

Ann Marie Whyte
College of Business Administration Ann Marie     Whyte My role as educator is an important component of my contributions to the University of Central Florida. Consistent with my goal of becoming a more effective educator, my teaching style has evolved considerably over the years. I recognize that students learn in a variety of ways and seek to create a rich environmen...