Program Assessment and Student Learning Outcomes (SLO's)

Programs are designed to meet personal, societal and/or employer needs. When designing a new program, SLO’s are written with a focus on these needs. The program curriculum is then developed from these SLO’s and program experiences and courses are built and organized to ensure optimal learning for students and optimal satisfaction in meeting the identified needs. Assessing the program becomes a matter of assessing the SLO’s and reflecting on their continued appropriateness.

Students and faculty should understand the organization of the SLO’s for their programs and courses. Courses that serve several programs will have outcomes that may be shared by these programs and others that are unique to each.

As with Course SLO's Program SLO's focus on:

  1. Major Content Knowledge
  2. Communication Skills
  3. Critical Thinking Skills
  4. Professionalism
  5. Ethics
  6. Professional Skills
  7. Research Methodology as appropriate

Program SLO's generally address Bloom's higher cognitive levels of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.

Contact your college's Academic Divisional Review Committee (DRC) to get assistance with preparing SLO's and plans.

Overview of Student Learning Outcomes (SLO's)

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.


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Ronald F. Demara
College of Engineering and Computer Science Ronald F.  Demara Effective teaching spans much more than conveying facts; it empowers the learner with intellectual inspiration, keen insights, and career-long skills. My enthusiasm for teaching has codified those objectives within my own discipline-specific philosophy via developing, delivering, and refining undergraduate cou...

Dennis Filler
College of Engineering & Computer Science Dennis Filler Since the Industrial Revolution U.S. universities have been producing assembly-line engineers, technically astute but weak in management skills. Traditionally, engineers have not been good managers and business owners. Then, in the late 1970s, academic decision makers decided that engineering schools should progre...

Barry Mauer
College of Arts and Sciences Barry   Mauer A university does not just teach salable skills. It should do that, but more importantly it teaches methods that lead to self-knowledge, critical thinking, citizenship--defined in its broadest sense as responsibility for one's locality, state, nation, and globe--and literacy, which is the ability to read and w...