Program Assessment and Student Learning Outcomes (SLO's)

Programs are designed to meet personal, societal and/or employer needs. When designing a new program, SLO’s are written with a focus on these needs. The program curriculum is then developed from these SLO’s and program experiences and courses are built and organized to ensure optimal learning for students and optimal satisfaction in meeting the identified needs. Assessing the program becomes a matter of assessing the SLO’s and reflecting on their continued appropriateness.

Students and faculty should understand the organization of the SLO’s for their programs and courses. Courses that serve several programs will have outcomes that may be shared by these programs and others that are unique to each.

As with Course SLO's Program SLO's focus on:

  1. Major Content Knowledge
  2. Communication Skills
  3. Critical Thinking Skills
  4. Professionalism
  5. Ethics
  6. Professional Skills
  7. Research Methodology as appropriate

Program SLO's generally address Bloom's higher cognitive levels of analysis, synthesis and evaluation.

Contact your college's Academic Divisional Review Committee (DRC) to get assistance with preparing SLO's and plans.
https://assessment.ucf.edu/

Overview of Student Learning Outcomes (SLO's)

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

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