Charting the Student Learning Outcomes (SLO's)

Understanding the relationship between a program goal and the SLO’s that lead students there is essential to designing an effective program. Creating the SLO’s at varying cognitive or performance levels is also essential for optimal learning.

The chart below provides a simple format for designing or validating the connections between program goals and their SLO’s. The verbs indicate the level of Bloom’s Taxonomy that might be chosen for to measure each. These are only examples and not recommended or required levels, though a variety including the higher orders is recommended.

Chart of course design

Chart of course design

* see bloom's taxonomy

Close Up: From Student Learning Outcomes to Courses

Understanding how all the Student Learning Outcomes are addressed in the courses comprising a program is essential to designing an effective program. Outcomes may be introduced (I), emphasized (E) or reinforced (R) in one or more courses. Activities and assessments may be developed at varying cognitive levels as defined by Bloom’s Taxonomy.

Schedule

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

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