Program Assessment

Description

Program Assessment involves first defining the program’s mission, its distinguishing purpose and commitment to the students and professional community. The program mission must be in accord with the University, College and School’s missions.

Goals for the program are then developed. These overarching aims provide direction for the specific objectives or outcomes of the program.

PROGRAM Objectives or Student Outcomes designate student performance in terms of specific, measurable activities that provide evidence of learning. A program’s student learning outcomes address three primary areas: 1) discipline specific knowledge, skills, attitudes, behaviors, and values; 2) communication; and 3) critical thinking. These outcomes are addressed in various courses and experiential learning opportunities throughout the program.

SMART Guidelines

MATT Guidelines

MATURE Guidelines

Direct Measurement Approaches

Evidence from direct measurements can be examined to determine if program change is warranted. If so, changes are implemented and the assessment cycle continues.

Indirect Measurement Approaches

Much can be learned from compiling information from current and former students and employers. Though this information cannot stand alone as a measure of effectiveness, it provides an additional option in reviewing performance.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Jeffrey Moore
College of Arts and Humanities Jeffrey  Moore Although the music discipline is inherently individualistic, a high standard of proficiency for all students is what university training represents. Percussion as a medium has the additional challenge of including thousands of instruments. Diversity of subject matter while finding common co...

Mitchell Salter
College of College of Health and Public Affairs Mitchell Salter The foundation for my teaching philosophy is to provide students with immediate tools to apply their knowledge. I agree with teachers of educational progressivism, such as John Dewey, who believe education should teach skills in real life activities. I require students to test their skills using a scientif...

William Safranek
College of Medicine William  Safranek I do not know if many educators formally construct their teaching philosophy before they walk into a classroom for the first time; I certainly did not when I started as an adjunct instructor at UCF in 1996 or when I became a full-time instructor in 2005. I am certain all educators think strongly about the kind o...