Mapping Assessments to Objective Types

Selecting the most appropriate tool for classroom assessment is not a rocket science. Many tools will work well in determining if progress toward student learning outcomes is satisfactory. The decision is often based on how comfortable you are with the tool.

Suggested tools for some circumstances follow:

What is Evaluated
Tool
How It's Done
What to do
With results
Knowledge and Skills One-Minute Paper*

During last few minutes of class period, ask students to use a small sheet of paper and write "Most important thing I learned today and what I understood least."

Review before next class meeting and use to clarify, correct, or elaborate.

Muddiest Point*

Similar to One-Minute Paper but only ask students to describe what they didn't understand and what they think might help.

Same as One-Minute Paper. If common response from many, reteach using a different method.

Student-generated test questions*

Divide the class into groups and assign each group a topic on which they are each to write a question and answer for the next test.

Use as many of the questions as possible, combining those that are similar.


Values or
Reactions to Instruction Methods
Journals or
Reflective
Writing

Ask students to keep journals or reflect periodically on something they value or on their reactions to class activities.

Have students turn in the journals several times during the semester so you can chart changes and development.

Exam Evaluations*

Select a test that you use regularly and add a few questions at the end which ask students to evaluate how well the test measures their knowledge or skills.

Make changes to the test that are reasonable. Track student responses over time.
Suggestion Box

Put a box near the classroom door and invite students to leave anonymous notes about any class issue.

Review and respond at the next class session.

*Most material in this table is adapted from Angelo, Thomas A. and K. Patricia Cross, 1993, Classroom Assessment Techniques: A Handbook for College Teachers, Second Edition, San Francisco: Jossey-Bass Publishers.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

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