Formative Classroom Assessment

Description:

Classroom assessments are formative in nature and thus are used to make immediate changes to teaching and learning strategies. They can occur at multiple times throughout a class and results can be used to improve course content, methods of teaching, and, ultimately, student learning. This is a just-in-time form of assessment that leads to immediate change if needed.

Examples of Classroom Assessment Tools:
Minute Papers (Angelo & Cross) Case Study Student Presentations
Misconception / Preconception Checks Analyzing Problems Quizzes graded/ungraded)
Peer Reviews Jigsaw (Aronson) Muddiest Point (Angelo & Cross)
Concept Mapping Role Play Beginners & Enders
Reflective Writings Student-led Discussions Think-Pair-Share Analysis

Interactive Teaching - this is a larger list of over one hundred interactive teaching techniques that can enable student learning and provide feedback to both instructors and learners.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Stephen Kuebler
College of Sciences Stephen  Kuebler My teaching philosophy is that pedagogic activities should be guided by the principal: “Do this if it enables students to learn.” My teaching practices should empower students to take ownership of their education and help them realize that they are responsible for their learning outcomes. When students...

Farrah M. Cato
College of Arts and Humanities Farrah M.  Cato My teaching has always focused on student-centered classrooms where critical thinking and active engagement are key. This foundation allows me to work on the primary goal of my pedagogy: to teach students how to use their education in the world around them. To this end, I employ a variety of strategies for differe...

Tison Pugh
College of Arts and Sciences Tison   Pugh The one common feature of all medieval literature, despite differences in authors, cultures, and genres, is that it is very, very old. When beginning my courses, I often face resistant students who have predetermined that, because of its age, the literature under examination is useless, if not altogether d...