Formative Classroom Assessment


Classroom assessments are formative in nature and thus are used to make immediate changes to teaching and learning strategies. They can occur at multiple times throughout a class and results can be used to improve course content, methods of teaching, and, ultimately, student learning. This is a just-in-time form of assessment that leads to immediate change if needed.

Examples of Classroom Assessment Tools:
Minute Papers (Angelo & Cross) Case Study Student Presentations
Misconception / Preconception Checks Analyzing Problems Quizzes graded/ungraded)
Peer Reviews Jigsaw (Aronson) Muddiest Point (Angelo & Cross)
Concept Mapping Role Play Beginners & Enders
Reflective Writings Student-led Discussions Think-Pair-Share Analysis

Interactive Teaching - this is a larger list of over one hundred interactive teaching techniques that can enable student learning and provide feedback to both instructors and learners.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.


Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Kevin Haran
College of Arts and Humanities Kevin Haran My goal in teaching studio art is to give students a college-level experience in creating a body of work that they would not have made on their own. This work will represent an awareness of traditional and contemporary issues in art. I challenge art students while offering encouragement as they pursue their educa...

Mary Tripp
College of Sciences Mary  Tripp In school, I believed that good writing was a “gift” for a chosen few, and I wasn’t one of the chosen. After many years, I realized that becoming a good writer is a struggle for everyone. Like learning to write, learning to teach is also a struggle for everyone. Good teaching is not a “gift” for a chosen few—good ...

Jennifer Kent-Walsh
College of Health and Public Affairs Jennifer  Kent-Walsh Goals & Foundational Principles Beyond striving to ensure that students learn the fundamental content of the courses I teach, my objectives as a university teacher are as follows: (a) to foster critical thinking skills; (b) to facilitate the acquisition of lifelong learning skills; (c) to help ...