Formative Classroom Assessment

Description:

Classroom assessments are formative in nature and thus are used to make immediate changes to teaching and learning strategies. They can occur at multiple times throughout a class and results can be used to improve course content, methods of teaching, and, ultimately, student learning. This is a just-in-time form of assessment that leads to immediate change if needed.

Examples of Classroom Assessment Tools:
Minute Papers (Angelo & Cross) Case Study Student Presentations
Misconception / Preconception Checks Analyzing Problems Quizzes graded/ungraded)
Peer Reviews Jigsaw (Aronson) Muddiest Point (Angelo & Cross)
Concept Mapping Role Play Beginners & Enders
Reflective Writings Student-led Discussions Think-Pair-Share Analysis

Interactive Teaching - this is a larger list of over one hundred interactive teaching techniques that can enable student learning and provide feedback to both instructors and learners.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

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Mustapha Mouloua
College of Sciences Mustapha Mouloua One of my primary goals as a teacher is to generate enthusiasm for the learning experience. Effective teaching requires capturing students’ interest, sparking their curiosity and providing them with the information that will increase their desire to further their knowledge and understanding. My goal is to he...

Aubrey Jewett
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Peter Telep
College of Arts and Sciences Peter  Telep During my time at UCF I have made some observations that strongly inform my teaching. Fact: Students who enroll in my classes do not, for the most part, enter the classroom without my enthusiasm for writing. Some are fairly determined; others want to learn enough to get by. Most do not actively seek feedback ...