Formative Classroom Assessment

Description:

Classroom assessments are formative in nature and thus are used to make immediate changes to teaching and learning strategies. They can occur at multiple times throughout a class and results can be used to improve course content, methods of teaching, and, ultimately, student learning. This is a just-in-time form of assessment that leads to immediate change if needed.

Examples of Classroom Assessment Tools:
Minute Papers (Angelo & Cross) Case Study Student Presentations
Misconception / Preconception Checks Analyzing Problems Quizzes graded/ungraded)
Peer Reviews Jigsaw (Aronson) Muddiest Point (Angelo & Cross)
Concept Mapping Role Play Beginners & Enders
Reflective Writings Student-led Discussions Think-Pair-Share Analysis

Interactive Teaching - this is a larger list of over one hundred interactive teaching techniques that can enable student learning and provide feedback to both instructors and learners.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Timothy Blair
College of Education Timothy Blair I began my career in education because of my grandmother‘s influence, who taught for fifty-six years in the public schools. Teaching—sparking an interest in learning and imparting new understandings and dispositions to students—is truly a gift. Through the years, teaching has not lost its unique...

Christopher Geiger
College of Engineering and Computer Science Christopher Geiger My teaching approach inside and outside the classroom is based on my view that an instructor, in addition to being a supplier of knowledge, is a facilitator of knowledge. In my opinion, an effective teacher should have sound fundamentals and command over the theoretical concepts as well as a broad knowledge beyon...

Jeff Biddle
College of Education and Human Performance Jeff  Biddle My teaching philosophy is based on my desire to help my students be successful in the classroom, in the program, and most importantly, in life after graduation. I truly believe that “students do not care what you know until they know that you care.” I try my best to learn the names of all of my students, find ...