Formative Classroom Assessment

Description:

Classroom assessments are formative in nature and thus are used to make immediate changes to teaching and learning strategies. They can occur at multiple times throughout a class and results can be used to improve course content, methods of teaching, and, ultimately, student learning. This is a just-in-time form of assessment that leads to immediate change if needed.

Examples of Classroom Assessment Tools:
Minute Papers (Angelo & Cross) Case Study Student Presentations
Misconception / Preconception Checks Analyzing Problems Quizzes graded/ungraded)
Peer Reviews Jigsaw (Aronson) Muddiest Point (Angelo & Cross)
Concept Mapping Role Play Beginners & Enders
Reflective Writings Student-led Discussions Think-Pair-Share Analysis

Interactive Teaching - this is a larger list of over one hundred interactive teaching techniques that can enable student learning and provide feedback to both instructors and learners.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Mohtashem Samsam
College of Medicine Mohtashem Samsam I love teaching. My areas of interest are anatomy, neuroanatomy and neuroscience. I teach the fundamental contents of the subject in a clinically-oriented way. I believe the clinical application of the topics fosters critical thinking, encourages case-based learning and problem-solving strategies, and facilitates...

Tammie Kaufman
College of Rosen College of Hospitality Management Tammie Kaufman The ability to reach a student and create a passion for learning is the greatest gift that can be given. During my undergraduate career I had one such instructor that “woke me up” and helped me to analyze and question what I read, and taught me how to apply what I learned to my life. This created the ...

Patricia Angley
College of Arts and Humanities Patricia     Angley Teaching literature and literary theory is a joyful experience for me the majority of the time. Of course, grading is always difficult and time-consuming work, but it is a task that shows me what has worked, what hasn't, and what needs to be done or revised. Face-to-face or online interaction with my students...