Formative Classroom Assessment

Description:

Classroom assessments are formative in nature and thus are used to make immediate changes to teaching and learning strategies. They can occur at multiple times throughout a class and results can be used to improve course content, methods of teaching, and, ultimately, student learning. This is a just-in-time form of assessment that leads to immediate change if needed.

Examples of Classroom Assessment Tools:
Minute Papers (Angelo & Cross) Case Study Student Presentations
Misconception / Preconception Checks Analyzing Problems Quizzes graded/ungraded)
Peer Reviews Jigsaw (Aronson) Muddiest Point (Angelo & Cross)
Concept Mapping Role Play Beginners & Enders
Reflective Writings Student-led Discussions Think-Pair-Share Analysis

Interactive Teaching - this is a larger list of over one hundred interactive teaching techniques that can enable student learning and provide feedback to both instructors and learners.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Kevin Mackie
College of Engineering and Computer Science Kevin Mackie I believe in challenging students with concepts and historical, theoretical, and contemporary problems while sharing my passion for the subject matter. Ensuring students are forced to think for themselves is essential. I accomplish this in my classes through team and individual problem-solving sessions, and compli...

Pamela Barton Roush
College of Business Administration Pamela Barton   Roush My philosophy is to inspire students to want to learn by providing interesting, challenging and fair learning opportunities. The university classroom should be a forum for discussion to promote critical thinking and communication through the blending of concepts and reality. Students should experience the ana...

Cynthia Hutchinson
College of Education Cynthia      Hutchinson I am a follower of Leo Buscaglia who prefers the term "educator" to "teacher." He explains that "educator" comes from the Latin term, "educare," which means to tend or support the growth of another. That is the role I hope to play in the lives of my students. I am careful to follow A. Bronson Alcott's ...