Formative Classroom Assessment

Description:

Classroom assessments are formative in nature and thus are used to make immediate changes to teaching and learning strategies. They can occur at multiple times throughout a class and results can be used to improve course content, methods of teaching, and, ultimately, student learning. This is a just-in-time form of assessment that leads to immediate change if needed.

Examples of Classroom Assessment Tools:
Minute Papers (Angelo & Cross) Case Study Student Presentations
Misconception / Preconception Checks Analyzing Problems Quizzes graded/ungraded)
Peer Reviews Jigsaw (Aronson) Muddiest Point (Angelo & Cross)
Concept Mapping Role Play Beginners & Enders
Reflective Writings Student-led Discussions Think-Pair-Share Analysis

Interactive Teaching - this is a larger list of over one hundred interactive teaching techniques that can enable student learning and provide feedback to both instructors and learners.

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Mark Calabrese
College of Engineering and Computer Science Mark      Calabrese Long before I graduated with my Master's degree, I knew I'd want to teach someday. I was inspired by previous UCF faculty that included Dr. Martin Wanielista (Environmental Engineering & Dean), Dr. Gary Whitehouse (Dean & Provost), and Dr. Christian Bauer (Industrial Engineering). I chose to pursue my PhD, but did...

Kristin Congdon
College of Arts and Humanities Kristin  Congdon Because I teach about art, film, aesthetics, and the humanities (with a focus on visual art), I feel blessed by having disciplines that make it easy for me to capture the attention of my audience. Everyone who can see, and even those who visualize only in their mind’s eye, can become engaged with ...

Alizera Rahrooh
College of Engineering and Computer Science Alizera   Rahrooh A "teaching philosophy" is a set of general principles used to guide practice. Mine is mostly second hand; some of it is gained by the many good teachers that I encountered in my education and some of it shaped by the insistent and critical students I have taught since first entering a college classroom as an ...