Classroom Assessment

Classroom assessments are formative in nature and thus are used to make immediate changes to teaching and learning strategies. They can occur at multiple times throughout a class and results can be used to improve course content, methods of teaching, and, ultimately, student learning. This is a just-in-time form of assessment that leads to immediate change if needed.

Examples of Classroom Assessment Tools:
Minute Papers (Angelo & Cross) Case Study Student Presentations
Misconception/Preconception Checks Analyzing Problems Quizzes (graded/ungraded)
Peer Reviews Jigsaw (Aronson) Muddiest Point (Angelo & Cross)
Concept Mapping Role Play Beginners & Enders
Reflective Writings Student-led Discussions Think-Pair-Share Analysis

101 Interactive Techniques

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Kenneth White
College of Business Administration Kenneth  White Formal education is highly correlated to national productivity and individual accomplishments. The skills that students develop help a nation’s productivity while at the same time reward individuals for their commitment to excellence. Teaching is, I believe, one of the most important endeavors taking pla...

John F. Weishampel
College of Sciences John F.  Weishampel In the end, we conserve only what we love
We will love only what we understand
We will understand only what we are taught
- Baba Dioum, Senegalese ecologist As a biologist who focuses on conservation issues, I thumb-tacked this quote to the bulletin board above my office desk. It continua...

Rudy McDaniel
College of Arts and Humanities Rudy McDaniel Father Guido Sarducci, a character famously portrayed by comedian Don Novello in the Saturday Night Live sketch The Five Minute University, makes the claim that the average college graduate remembers only five minutes worth of material five years after graduation. Rather than really learning, he says, these stude...