MATT Guidelines

Measuring Student Learning Outcomes*
Match Match The measures match the specific knowledge, skill, behavior, value outcome, communication outcome, or critical thinking outcome that is expected.
Approach The objectives should be stated in measurable terms. Direct measures include assessments that evaluate ability in one of the areas noted. Indirect measures can be survey responses to targeted questions or ancillary parts of a direct measure. (There are times when one outcome measure could measure more than one area. For example, if a student is giving a presentation of the project (s)he has done to show understanding of something in the discipline, communication skills may be evaluated, as well.)
Timeliness The measure should specify an appropriate time-frame for obtaining the measurement information (e.g., at the end of the spring semester).
Target Should help to identify where program improvements are needed. It should be aggressive and directed.
* Note: Each Student learning outcome should have at least two measures.
One of those measures must be a direct measure of the outcome.

SMART Guidelines

MATURE Guidelines

In addition to the information included here, we invite you to participate in events focused on Assessment listed in our calendar and to contact the Faculty Center for additional assistance.

 

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Xin He
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Karen Mottarella
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Peter Jacques
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