Course Design

Photo of Classroom with students on classes

Assessment - the website for all your assessment needs: student learning outcomes, measures, rubrics, teaching effectiveness, and more.

Course Planning - resources and worksheets on designing a course with an eye toward program integration, defined goals, measurable objectives, and aligned assessments. For online course planning, visit the pedagogy link at the Center for Distributed Learning.

Learning Theories - information on theories and how instructors can utilize them to maximize student learning potential.

Syllabus - tips for syllabus construction, including Provost's requirements, resources, sample statements, templates, and more.

Teaching Methods - an overview of different methods and modes of instructions, including tips on effective lecturing, collaboration, and active learning.

UCF Policies - information from the UCF Policies and Procedures Manual that is directly relevant for your teaching and classroom experiences.

Universal Design for Learning– an annotated bibliography on the principles of UDL, example course materials, tips for creating accessible documents, and more.

Bloom's Taxonomy of Educational Objectives - this overview explains how Bloom's Taxonomy can be useful for determining both course goals and appropriate assessments, and may also be used to write effective test questions.

Flippping the Classroom - this is to assist in navigating the basics of the flipped teaching methodology.

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Lisa Smith
College of Health & Public Affairs Lisa  Smith My philosophy of teaching and learning is multifaceted. My teaching environment is complex due to the fact that I teach in classroom and clinical environments. Throughout the classroom and clinical experiences I teach the information and critical thinking processes that the students will lea...

Cynthia Gundy
College of Business Administration Cynthia  Gundy A college education is about preparing students for the rest of their professional lives. Indeed students must be taught the discipline's jargon, its decision making tools and how best to apply them as well as the underlying foundation on which those theories are based. But so many other critical lessons are k...

Jane Compson
College of Arts and Humanities Jane Compson ‘How do we know?’ This is a key question in many philosophical and religious traditions, and is one my students consider in many different contexts. Just as important, though, is the question of the way in which we know things. In our culture, we tend to take it for granted that the rational and the se...