Six Standards of Scholarly Work
by Charles E. Glassick, Mary Huber, Gene Maeroff

1. Clear Goals

Does the scholar state the basic purposes of his or her work clearly? Does the scholar Clear Goals define objectives that are realistic and achievable? Does the scholar identify important questions in the field?

2. Adequate Preparation

Does the scholar show an understanding of existing scholarship in the field? Does the scholar bring the necessary skills to his or her work? Does the scholar bring together the resources necessary to move the project forward?

3. Appropriate Methods

Does the scholar use methods appropriate to the goals? Does the scholar apply effectively the methods selected? Does the scholar modify procedures in response to changing circumstances?

4. Significant Results

Does the scholar achieve the goals? Does the scholar’s work add consequentially to the field? Does the scholar’s work open additional areas for further exploration?

5. Effective Presentation

Does the scholar use a suitable style and effective organization to present his or her work? Does the scholar use appropriate forums for communicating work to its intended audiences? Does the scholar present his or her message with clarity and integrity?

6. Reflective Critique

Does the scholar critically evaluate his or her own work? Does the scholar bring an appropriate breadth of evidence to his or her critique? Does the scholar use evaluation to improve the quality of future work?

Source: Scholarship Assessed: Evaluation of the Professoriate. Carnegie Foundation for the Advancement of Teaching. San Francisco: Jossey-Bass, 1997.

 

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