August - Week 1

Hello Everyone-
Below you’ll find information about upcoming programming and opportunities at the Faculty Center. 
Have a great week,
Melody

FACULTY CENTER HAPPENINGS FOR THE WEEK 
The activities below will take place in the Faculty Center (Classroom Building One, room 207) unless otherwise noted. If you would like to participate virtually, please email fctl@ucf.edu for information and assistance.

Thursday, August 9th
Faculty Writing Club—10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

Friday, August 10th
Faculty Writing Club—10:00 a.m. to 12:00 p.m.

FALL 2018 FACULTY CENTER PROGRAMMING
Every semester, the Faculty Center offers several opportunities to help faculty innovate or refine teaching techniques and learning activities. Events for the upcoming fall semester include three Course Innovation Projects:

  • Active-Learning Strategies for Classes of Different Sizes and Modalities
  • Teaching in Active-Learning Spaces
  • WAC Methods for Implementing Student Peer Review
and two book clubs:
  • Minds on Fire by Mark Carnes
  • A Guide to Teaching in the Active Learning Classroom: History, Research, and Practice by Paul Baepler et al.

Please visit http://fctl.ucf.edu/Events/FacultyDevelopmentCohorts/ for full details, dates, and registration instructions.

ADOBE LICENSE POOL REQUEST FOR PROPOSALS
The Division of Teaching and Learning has a limited pool of Adobe Creative Cloud licenses to offer students on a per-semester basis; these licenses enable access to the entire suite of creative products, including software such as Photoshop, Illustrator, InDesign, Dreamweaver, Premiere Pro, and After Effects. If you have an idea for students to use these products in your class, submit a proposal by August 10th at http://ucf.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9LixqBfqhmv3vN3.

LET US KNOW YOUR EXPERTISE!
The Faculty Center is working to identify experts in various teaching methods among our faculty colleagues. If you have strong experience in any of the following major pedagogical approaches, we’d love to hear from you:

  • Inquiry-Guided Learning
  • Socratic Method
  • Case Study Method
  • Problem-Based Learning
  • Project-Based Learning
  • Creating and Delivering an Effective Lecture (Virtual and/or In-Person)
  • Managing Productive Student Groups
  • Effective Discussions
  • Learning (Including Role Plays, Service-Learning, Student Presentations)
  • Broad Teaching Approaches

Just drop an email to ann.miller@ucf.edu or eric.main@ucf.edu and tell us about what you’re doing with regard to a given teaching approach in your classes.

FACULTY WRITING CLUB SUMMER 2018
Having trouble getting into a good writing rhythm? Need to get away from your office to get a change of perspective and a little privacy? Forget the coffee shop—join your colleagues on Thursday and Friday mornings from 10 a.m.-12 p.m. in FCTL for a loosely structured writing session. We'll take five or six minutes each week to go around the room and state a goal for the time block and then spend the rest of the time working on our individual projects. Bring your own laptop or use an FCTL computer. And of course there will be coffee. Everyone is welcome!

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Peter Telep
College of Arts and Sciences Peter  Telep During my time at UCF I have made some observations that strongly inform my teaching. Fact: Students who enroll in my classes do not, for the most part, enter the classroom without my enthusiasm for writing. Some are fairly determined; others want to learn enough to get by. Most do not actively seek feedback ...

Arup Guha
College of Engineering & Computer Science Arup   Guha The ultimate goal of any educator should be to enable his/her students to achieve their potential, not only in a specific class, but in life in general. I attempt to attain this goal through four major techniques: providing a friendly classroom atmosphere, providing encouragement for all groups of students, adapti...

Tison Pugh
College of Arts and Sciences Tison   Pugh The one common feature of all medieval literature, despite differences in authors, cultures, and genres, is that it is very, very old. When beginning my courses, I often face resistant students who have predetermined that, because of its age, the literature under examination is useless, if not altogether d...