Faculty Focus Submissions

Purpose

The publication will document curricular innovation and will recognize teaching excellence for the primary purpose of enhancing instruction at UCF while encouraging creative and interdisciplinary efforts to develop new knowledge.

Call for Submissions

Do you have a faculty experience to share? We welcome article submissions by UCF faculty members. See the guidelines below for length specifications.

Audience

The primary audience members are your peers, classroom instructors at UCF who desire to increase student success and to foster scholarly community.

Article Content

The focus of the submission should be on your pedagogy. Please keep the length between 500 and 1,000 words. The following structure may be used to arrange your essay. It is only a suggestion.

  • 1. Context: Briefly describe the need or problem that was addressed.
  • 2. Innovation: Identify and discuss your changes; for example, a new classroom method, a new tool or activity, a new use of technology to address the problem, etc.
  • 3. Implementation: What you did and how you did it? What resources/contacts you required and how you found them? What difficulties or surprise successes you experienced?
  • 4. Assessment: How did you evaluate your innovation? How did you measure learning outcomes?
  • 5. Conclusion: Your reflections and any new goals arising from your experience.

Media

Send email attachments to fctl@ucf.edu.

Formats

  • Copy: MS Word document, Times New Roman font, 12 point pitch.
  • Paragraphs: all single spaced, no indents, single line-space between paragraphs.
  • Photos/Illustrations: please include a photo of yourself (headshot) and use TIF (300 dpi) or JPEG (with least amount of compression). We can scan a photo for you if you bring it to us, or we can take the photo ourselves.

Deadlines

End of the second week in February for the March Publication

End of the second week in July for the August Publication

End of the second week in October for the November Publication

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Mary Tripp
College of Sciences Mary  Tripp In school, I believed that good writing was a “gift” for a chosen few, and I wasn’t one of the chosen. After many years, I realized that becoming a good writer is a struggle for everyone. Like learning to write, learning to teach is also a struggle for everyone. Good teaching is not a “gift” for a chosen few—good ...

Kristin G. Congdon
College of Arts and Humanities Kristin G. Congdon My approach to education is informed by my early and ongoing experiences teaching in a variety of settings. Besides working in public schools (elementary, middle, and high school), I have also taught art in correctional facilities, residential treatment centers, museums, Elderhostels and retirement homes. My stude...

Michael Strawser
College of Arts and Humanities Michael Strawser All true education and edification (or Bildung, which nicely captures the meanings of both words) is based on respect, and I am thankful to have consistently scored highest in this category on my student perception of instruction forms. There are several ways that I try to respect my students, perhaps the most im...