Resources for Making Post-Hurricane Course Adjustments

Consultations and Workshops

Staff from the Faculty Center will be available all week from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. to help faculty prioritize learning outcomes, assessment strategies, and course content when making curricular changes. We will offer advice for revising your syllabus, schedule, and lectures. Please bring copies of any relevant course documents that you need to revise. Team members from the Center for Distributed Learning (CDL) will also be available in the Faculty Center (CB1-207) for many hours this week.

Additionally, the Faculty Center and CDL will offer workshops on tips for making mid-semester course changes. If you cannot attend in person, please email us at fctl@ucf.edu, and we will send you a link for participating remotely. Times include:

  1. Monday, September 18th 10:30 – 11:30
  2. Tuesday, September 19th 2:00 – 3:00
  3. Wednesday, September 20th 12:00 – 1:00

In addition to the workshops focusing on academic adjustments, a panel designed to provide assistance to faculty and staff relating to traumatic stress will be open to non-CIP members on Wednesday, September 20th from 2:00 p.m. – 4:00 p.m. in CB1-205. It can also provide information for you to pass on to your students. Counseling & Psychological Services (CAPS), CARES, Employee Assistance Program (EAP), Student Accessibility Services (SAS), Veterans Academic Resource Center (VARC), Victim Services, and Wellness & Promotions will be represented.

Tips for Making Post-Hurricane Course Adjustments

  1. Depending on how much class time your students have lost, you may need to re-prioritize the course objectives listed in the syllabus. 
    1. First, revisit your course plan and how the existing course objectives are aligned to the assessments.  If you have access to the curriculum map for your program, review how your course fits with the program-level outcomes (also see http://oeas.ucf.edu/academiclearningcompacts.html).  If you do not have access to a curriculum map, review any program courses that rely on your course as a pre- or co-requisite.  This will give you a better idea of the essential objectives.  Here is an example alignment grid for a Chemistry Lab class:

      Assessment

      Prepare solutions

      Develop critical thinking skills

      Communicate
      laboratory terminology  (text /oral)

      Analyze data (algebra  & graphs)

      Relates  course to real life

      Pre-lab quiz

      x

      x

      Lab artifacts

      x

      x

      x

      x

      x

      Answer key

      x

      x

      x

      Quiz

      x

      x

      x

      Reflection

      x

      x

      x

      Survey

      x

    2. Next, differentiate content that is absolutely essential to the program or course from non-essential or “good to know” content.
    3. Then, re-prioritize objectives and content as appropriate.
  1. Strategies and options for re-prioritized course elements
    1. Make all planned material available but not necessarily required
    2. Consolidate multiple exams or quizzes
    3. Assess some learning objectives via formative instruments (online quiz, peer-graded assignments, polling sessions, class discussions, etc.)
    4. Replace assessment with in-class group activities
    5. Have students generate exam questions and share via discussion board (include their questions on exam)
    6. Replace exam(s) with reflection paper or journal entries
    7. Take this as an opportunity to teach conciseness (essays or research projects, etc.)
    8. Provide students opportunity to provide their own strategies for achieving learning objectives
    9. Streamline course readings as appropriate
    10. Record supplemental mini-lectures to bridge critical content gaps (see below for how-to)
  1. Revising the syllabus and schedule
    1. Date your revised syllabus as of September 22, 2017 and distribute to students
    2. Make sure you include a significant assessment and time for feedback before withdrawal deadline (new deadline November 6)
    3. DUE DATE CHANGER:
      To save you time in making course adjustments resulting from Hurricane Irma, a new tool from CDL is now more prominent within Webcourses@UCF for the duration of the fall 2017 term.  The Due Date Changer allows you to 1) view all of your existing course assignments on one screen, 2) easily edit the “Due At” and “Available Until” dates, and 3) save only once! In the left-hand navigation menu of any course, please look for the “Due Date Changer” button toward the bottom of the menu. How-to and support instructions for this tool are available at: https://cdl.ucf.edu/date-changer.
  2. Additional Concerns
    1. Students who may still lack power or connectivity            
      1. Add students to “assign to” setting in Webcourses: https://community.canvaslms.com/docs/DOC-9973-4152101242
      2. Keep online quizzes and assignments open
      3. Create study guide for exams
    2. Students employed by emergency management organizations
      1. Consider sharing lecture notes with them
      2. Create study guide for exams
    3. Classroom environment
      1. Acknowledge what is happening and reassure students of your plans to make reasonable accommodations
      2. Familiarize students with campus and community resources like the Student Academic Resource Center (http://sarc.sdes.ucf.edu/), UCF Cares (http://cares.sdes.ucf.edu), Counseling and Psychological Services (http://caps.sdes.ucf.edu/), and the Knights Helping Knights Pantry (http://studentunion.ucf.edu/knights-pantry/)
    4. Practice Self-Care
      1. Acknowledge impacts on yourself
      2. Employee Assistance Program (EAP) services are available to assist Faculty, A&P, and USPS employees and their eligible family members, including spouses, dependent children, parents, and parents-in-law, who were impacted by Hurricane Irma. Visit http://www.healthadvocate.com/emails/HurricaneIrma/Hurricane-Irma-Resources.pdf for a list of Hurricane Irma support resources.
      3. Visit www.healthadvocate.com/members for additional resources available to UCF employees through the Health Advocate EAP program.
      4. Seek to network and participate in professional development opportunities

Video Resources

Here's a short video on creating video lectures to supplement missed class time:

Below are several resources for recording supplemental lectures and creating video files from them:

Once your video is created, be aware that longer videos take up more storage space; if you anticipate making longer videos, consider uploading your video file to a content host like YouTube rather than counting against your Canvas storage limit. If using YouTube, keep in mind that it offers an auto-caption feature. In addition, CDL’s video production team (Video@CDL) stands ready to convert and host your faculty-created videos regardless of modality this semester via CDL’s Vimeo Pro hosting service. Hosting on this centralized service is recommended to better support faculty use of video, especially vis-à-vis student accessibility accommodations. For guidance in recording mini-lecture videos and to submit your video(s) for hosting, please visit: https://ucf.qualtrics.com/jfe/form/SV_9mjb1W1vwfO3aYZ

(Note: A CDL team member will be happy to assist with this process on-site at FCTL or the FMC.)

The Faculty Multimedia Center also offers several media and recording resources for faculty members' use.

If you're interested in more information and best practices on video lectures, see the following resources: At the bottom of this page you will also find some resources on narrated PowerPoint presentations. The Faculty Center hosts instructions for creating a narrated presentation, Video Production and Screencasts, and Flipping the Classroom.

 

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