Faculty Advisors

Faculty Advisors

Faculty members are sometimes asked to advise students informally on completing their course of study. If you believe you need access to the advising functions in the myUCF Portal, speak with your department chair.

Faculty members with questions about advising procedures or degree requirements should turn to their College Advising Office for assistance.

Faculty roles as advisors may include:

  • Sharing knowledge of the requirements of program of study and changes from recent years
  • Sharing knowledge of careers available for students with specific majors
  • Sharing knowledge of trends in the field of study
  • Assisting students in yearly planning of course work
  • Suggesting course substitutions (which must be approved by program coordinators)
  • Being available for advising during peak hours (orientation and registration periods)
  • Completing grade changes within a semester of first grade awarded
  • Discussing terms and agreement of grade changes
  • Discussing incomplete grades with students and complete online incomplete grade form
  • Advising undergraduate and graduate students in specific majors
  • Recommending appropriate electives to prepare students for a career path

See the page on Advisor Procedures for tutorials on how to perform specific advising functions.

College Advising Offices

Once students declare a major, they work exclusively with the advising office in their college. This office is also the first point of contact for faculty members with questions on degree requirements or advising procedures.

Academic Advising Council

The individual advising offices mentioned above are represented at a university committee called the Academic Advising Council (AAC), which meets several times per semester to address advising concerns at the university.

Other Resources

See this page for other resources for faculty advisors, as provided by the National Academic Advising Association (NACADA).

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Claudia Schippert
College of Arts and Humanities Claudia  Schippert At the center of my teaching philosophy is my commitment to challenge students to examine “common sense” knowledge and to think creatively from different perspectives in order to grapple with complex negotiations of religious, political, and cultural identities in different times and places. I ask ...

Karl Sooder
College of Business Administration Karl  Sooder Respect is a simple, but a very powerful and dynamic, life change-agent. Ideally, we demonstrate respect for our students, faculty /administration colleagues and community citizens through our personal demeanor, conduct and by our personal leadership both within and beyond the classroom. Respect is at the core of ...

Aubrey Jewett
College of Arts and Sciences Aubrey   Jewett Active learning fosters academic success. When students take part in the learning process they learn more and retain more than when operating in the passive mode. Thus whether attending a local council meeting, performing statistical analysis on data to investigate a research question or using t...