Winter Faculty Development Conference

2016 Winter Faculty Development Conference

Tuesday through Thursday
December 13-15, 2016
8am - 5pm

Participants will be expected to attend the entire conference to receive payment. Those who cannot attend all sessions on all three days are welcome to participate in as much of the conference as they are able but will not be eligible for funding. This includes those who must miss to complete grading duties or other university business.

Click here to view the Winter Conference Agenda.

A 2015 Winter Conference group carries on their discussion during a Friday lunch meeting.

The Karen L. Smith Faculty Center for Teaching and Learning brings you the 2016 Winter Faculty Development Conference. Each conference is guided by a central theme. Past conferences have focused on topics such as student success, transformative learning, building community in politically or socially divisive moments, interdisciplinary collaboration among faculty, and inviting new voices into conversations about campus and classroom challenges. This year’s theme is Dealing with Difficult Moments in the Classroom.

Each participating faculty member joins a cohort of colleagues from across campus, makes a prepared presentation about professional practice related to the theme, attends workshops, and engages in think tank sessions about issues of importance to the institution and the surrounding community. The event features some elements of a typical academic conference and other elements similar to a working retreat. All UCF faculty and staff are welcome to attend all or part of the event. Funded faculty participants are expected to attend all sessions on each of the three days.

The theme of the 2016 conference will be Dealing with Difficult Moments in the Classroom.

Proposal Criteria
Each applicant for funding will propose an individual 8–10-minute informal, discussion-based presentation describing how she or he has successfully managed difficult moments in the classroom with an eye toward promoting student success. This topic is necessarily broad with the goal of promoting a wide range of presentations that stimulate thought and provide colleagues with opportunities to collaborate to improve classroom practice and share insights about challenges. Topics might include, but are not limited to: managing tense classroom conversations in all modalities, balancing faculty and student rights and responsibilities, addressing the needs of students with varied levels of existing knowledge in a course, building community in a politically divisive moment, maintaining focus on learning goals despite distractions around us. New faculty members are especially invited to attend and may choose to frame their presentations in terms of a challenge they are facing.

Applications will be reviewed using the following criteria: 

  • Quality/clarity of presentation description
  • Relevance of the presentation to the conference theme
  • New faculty members will be given special consideration.

Deliverables from the conference will include 1) a brief write-up and other materials from the individual faculty presentation to be shared as a faculty resource, and 2) a collaborative conference product to be composed by each interdisciplinary faculty cohort during the event. 

Please note:

  • Registration is for individuals only.
  • Selected faculty members who attend all sessions and submit the required deliverables will receive a $500 grant subject to normal withholding tax.
  • Proposals are due at 5 p.m. on November 14, 2016.
  • Final decisions on acceptance will be provided to all applicants by November 21, 2016.

Please confirm availability from 8:00 a.m. to 5:00 p.m. on December 13–15 before applying.  

 

Winter Conferences listed by year:
 
2015  2014  2013  2012  2011  2010  2009  2008 
2007  2006  2005  2004  2003  2002  2001  2000  1999 

 

Faculty Spotlight View Other Award Winners

Scott Bukstein
College of Business Administration Scott  Bukstein My teaching philosophy is centered on challenging undergraduate students intellectually to enable students to develop personally, academically, and professionally. I fully understand that there is a difference between an instructor lecturing and students learning. I view each class period as an interactive bus...

Arup Guha
College of Engineering and Computer Science Arup  Guha The ultimate goal of any educator should be to enable his/her students to achieve their potential. I attempt to attain this goal through three major techniques: creating a friendly classroom atmosphere, giving challenging and creative assignments and exams, and adapting my courses to the specific students that I h...

Terri Fine
College of Sciences Terri     Fine My foundational approach to teaching is that content expertise must be transmitted well to a diverse learner population. While the substantive content goals are the same for every student, students come to me as individuals, with different interests, background knowledge, and skills. I try to draw every student in...